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Randolph County Health Department
1319 E Hwy 24, Suite A, Moberly, MO 65270

660-263-6643
660-263-0333

COVID-19

moving to new location

Frequently Asked Questions

Yes

Not everyone shows symptoms (they are referred to as asymptomatic), but those who do typically begin showing them 2-14 days after exposure. They include;

Fever or Chills, Cough, Shortness of breath, difficulty breathing, Chest Pain, Fatigue, Muscle or body ache, Headache, New loss of taste or smell, Sore throat, Congestion or runny nose, Nausea or Vomiting, and/or Diarrhea.

Being a “close contact” of a positive COVID-19 patient means that you were within 6 feet of the patient for 15 minutes or more.

Our communicable disease nurse or another staff member trained in contact tracing will be in contact with the positive case and determine all those who were considered a close contact (closer than 6 feet for more than 15 minutes) 2 days before symptoms first appeared up until the date of interview.

If the patient is asymptomatic, the nurse will obtain close contacts for two weeks (14 days) prior to the positive test.

All those who are considered close contacts to the patient will be contacted directly by our communicable disease nurse and told to quarantine and monitor for symptoms.

If someone is under quarantine, that just means that they are monitoring for symptoms. You only need to monitor for symptoms you were a close contact to a person with a confirmed positive COVID-19 test. The CDC recommends quarantining direct contacts only, not contacts of contacts.

Masks can be a very effective tool in reducing the spread of COVID-19. While they have limited ability to protect you from someone else, they are very effective in preventing you from spreading it to others if you unknowingly have the virus.

People have a right to have their health information private and are protected under HIPPA. In a small community it can be easy to identify a person based on where they live or work. We work directly with the patient and determine close contact and let those people know immediately that they need to quarantine and monitor for symptoms.

In the event that we would be unable to determine close contacts of the individual (if they went to a mass gathering) we would release the location, dates, and times that the individual was there and inform anyone at that gathering to self-quarantine and monitor for symptoms.

The first thing you would want to do would to be call your primary healthcare provider (if you do not have one, call the Randolph County Health Department clinic at 660-262-6643 ext. 204).

REMEMBER: Tell the person on the phone that you believe you have COVID-19 before showing up so the staff can prepare for your arrival. They will often ask you to come through a different door in order to limit exposure to other patients. They may even be able to see you virtually and not have you come into the office at all.

Once you are seen by the physician, they can write an order for you to be tested if they believe you may have COVID-19.

The RCHD follows all CDC guidelines. These parameters are updated as more information becomes available. The most current guidance can be found at
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/if-you-are-sick/end-home-isolation.html

For the Most Up-to-date information, visit the websites of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) , the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS), or the World Health Organization (WHO).


COVID-19 in the United States

Everyone can do their part to help us respond to this emerging public health threat:

  • On March 16, the White House announced a program called “15 Days to Slow the Spread,” which is a nationwide effort to slow the spread of COVID-19 through the implementation of social distancing at all levels of society.
  • Older people and people with severe chronic conditions should take special precautions because they are at higher risk of developing serious COVID-19 illness.
  • If you are a healthcare provider, use your judgment to determine if a patient has signs and symptoms compatible with COVID-19 and whether the patient should be tested. Factors to consider in addition to clinical symptoms may include:
    • Does the patient have recent travel from an affected area?
    • Has the patient been in close contact with someone with COVID-19 or with patients with pneumonia of unknown cause?
    • Does the patient reside in an area where there has been community spread of COVID-19?
  • If you are a healthcare provider or a public health responder caring for a COVID-19 patient, please take care of yourself and follow recommended infection control procedures.
  • People who get a fever or cough should consider whether they might have COVID-19, depending on where they live, their travel history or other exposures. More than half of the U.S. is seeing some level of community spread of COVID-19. Testing for COVID-19 may be accessed through medical providers or public health departments, but there is no treatment for this virus. Most people have mild illness and are able to recover at home without medical care.
  • For people who are ill with COVID-19 but are not sick enough to be hospitalized, please follow CDC guidance on how to reduce the risk of spreading your illness to others. People who are mildly ill with COVID-19 are able to isolate at home during their illness.
  • If you have been in China or another affected area or have been exposed to someone sick with COVID-19 in the last 14 days, you will face some limitations on your movement and activity. Please follow instructions during this time. Your cooperation is integral to the ongoing public health response to try to slow spread of this virus.

Click below to learn more about COVID-19.

COVID-19 Emergence

COVID-19 is caused by a coronavirus. Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that are common in people and many different species of animals, including camels, cattle, cats, and bats. Rarely, animal coronaviruses can infect people and then spread between people such as with MERS-CoVSARS-CoV, and now with this new virus (named SARS-CoV-2).

The SARS-CoV-2 virus is a betacoronavirus, like MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV. All three of these viruses have their origins in bats. The sequences from U.S. patients are similar to the one that China initially posted, suggesting a likely single, recent emergence of this virus from an animal reservoir.

Early on, many of the patients at the epicenter of the outbreak in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China had some link to a large seafood and live animal market, suggesting animal-to-person spread. Later, a growing number of patients reportedly did not have exposure to animal markets, indicating person-to-person spread. Person-to-person spread was subsequently reported outside Hubei and in countries outside China, including in the United States. Some international destinations now have ongoing community spread with the virus that causes COVID-19, as do some parts of the United States. Community spread means some people have been infected and it is not known how or where they became exposed. Learn more about the spread of this newly emerged coronavirus.

COVID-19 Pandemic

A pandemic is a global outbreak of disease. Pandemics happen when a new virus emerges to infect people and can spread between people sustainably. Because there is little to no pre-existing immunity against the new virus, it spreads worldwide.

The virus that causes COVID-19 is infecting people and spreading easily from person-to-person. Cases have been detected in most countries worldwide and community spread is being detected in a growing number of countries. On March 11, the COVID-19 outbreak was characterized as a pandemic by the WHO.

This is the first pandemic known to be caused by the emergence of a new coronavirus. In the past century, there have been four pandemics caused by the emergence of novel influenza viruses. As a result, most research and guidance around pandemics is specific to influenza, but the same premises can be applied to the current COVID-19 pandemic. Pandemics of respiratory disease follow a certain progression outlined in a “Pandemic Intervals Framework.” Pandemics begin with an investigation phase, followed by recognition, initiation, and acceleration phases. The peak of illnesses occurs at the end of the acceleration phase, which is followed by a deceleration phase, during which there is a decrease in illnesses. Different countries can be in different phases of the pandemic at any point in time and different parts of the same country can also be in different phases of a pandemic.

There are ongoing investigations to learn more. This is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.

Severity

The complete clinical picture with regard to COVID-19 is not fully known. Reported illnesses have ranged from very mild (including some with no reported symptoms) to severe, including illness resulting in death. While information so far suggests that most COVID-19 illness is mild, a report out of China suggests serious illness occurs in 16% of cases. Older people and people of all ages with severe chronic medical conditions — like heart disease, lung disease and diabetes, for example — seem to be at higher risk of developing serious COVID-19 illness. A CDC Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report that looked at severity of disease among COVID-19 cases in the United States by age group found that 80% of deaths were among adults 65 years and older with the highest percentage of severe outcomes occurring in people 85 years and older.

Learn more about the symptoms associated with COVID-19.

Risk Assessment

Risk depends on characteristics of the virus, including how well it spreads between people; the severity of resulting illness; and the medical or other measures available to control the impact of the virus (for example, vaccines or medications that can treat the illness) and the relative success of these. In the absence of vaccine or treatment medications, nonpharmaceutical interventions become the most important response strategy. These are community interventions that can reduce the impact of disease.

The risk from COVID-19 to Americans can be broken down into risk of exposure versus risk of serious illness and death.

Risk of Exposure

  • The immediate risk of being exposed to this virus is still low for most Americans, but as the outbreak expands, that risk will increase. Cases of COVID-19 and instances of community spread are being reported in a growing number of states.
  • People in places where ongoing community spread of the virus that causes COVID-19 has been reported are at elevated risk of exposure, with the level of risk dependent on the location.
  • Healthcare workers caring for patients with COVID-19 are at elevated risk of exposure.
  • Close contacts of persons with COVID-19 also are at elevated risk of exposure.
  • Travelers returning from affected international locationswhere community spread is occurring also are at elevated risk of exposure, with level of risk dependent on where they traveled.

Risk of Severe Illness

Early information out of China, where COVID-19 first started, shows that some people are at higher risk of getting very sick from this illness. This includes:

  • Older adults, with risk increasing by age.
  • People who have serious chronic medical conditions like:
    • Heart disease
    • Diabetes
    • Lung disease

CDC has developed guidance to help in the risk assessment and management of people with potential exposures to COVID-19.

What May Happen

More cases of COVID-19 are likely to be identified in the United States in the coming days, including more instances of community spread. CDC expects that widespread transmission of COVID-19 in the United States will occur. In the coming months, most of the U.S. population will be exposed to this virus.

Widespread transmission of COVID-19 could translate into large numbers of people needing medical care at the same time. Schools, childcare centers, and workplaces, may experience more absenteeism. Mass gatherings may be sparsely attended or postponed. Public health and healthcare systems may become overloaded, with elevated rates of hospitalizations and deaths. Other critical infrastructure, such as law enforcement, emergency medical services, and sectors of the transportation industry may also be affected. Healthcare providers and hospitals may be overwhelmed. At this time, there is no vaccine to protect against COVID-19 and no medications approved to treat it. Nonpharmaceutical interventions will be the most important response strategy to try to delay the spread of the virus and reduce the impact of disease.

CDC Response

Global efforts at this time are focused concurrently on lessening the spread and impact of this virus. The federal government is working closely with state, local, tribal, and territorial partners, as well as public health partners, to respond to this public health threat.

Highlights of CDC’s Response

  • CDC established a COVID-19 Incident Management System on January 7, 2020. On January 21, CDC activated its Emergency Operations Center to better provide ongoing support to the COVID-19 response.
  • The U.S. government has taken unprecedented steps with respect to travelin response to the growing public health threat posed by this new coronavirus:
    • Foreign nationals who have been in China, Iran, the United Kingdom, Ireland and any one of the 26 European countries in the Schengen Area within the past 14 days cannot enter the United States.
    • S. citizens, residents, and their immediate family members who have been any one of those countries within in the past 14 days can enter the United States, but they are subject to health monitoring and possible quarantine for up to 14 days.
    • People at higher risk of serious COVID-19 illness avoid cruise traveland non-essential air travel.
    • CDC has issued additional specific travel guidancerelated to COVID-19.
  • CDC has issued clinical guidance, including:
  • CDC also has issued guidance for other settings, including:
  • CDC has deployed multidisciplinary teams to support state health departments in case identification, contact tracing, clinical management, and public communications.
  • CDC has worked with federal partners to support the safe return of Americans overseas who have been affected by COVID-19.
  • An important part of CDC’s role during a public health emergency is to develop a test for the pathogen and equip state and local public health labs with testing capacity.
    • CDC developed an rRT-PCR test to diagnose COVID-19.
    • As of the evening of March 17, 89 state and local public health labsin 50 states, the District of Columbia, Guam, and Puerto Rico have successfully verified and are currently using CDC COVID-19 diagnostic tests.
    • Commercial manufacturers are now producing their own tests.
  • CDC has grown the COVID-19 virus in cell culture, which is necessary for further studies, including for additional genetic characterization. The cell-grown virus was sent to NIH’s BEI Resourcesfor use by the broad scientific community.
  • CDC also is developing a serology testfor COVID-19.

© Randolph County Health Department